Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in west Africa is unprecedented in many ways, including the high proportion of doctors, nurses, and other health care workers who have been infected.

To date, more than 240 health care workers have developed the disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, and more than 120 have died.

MDG Momentum – 500 days to the MDGs

Key facts on the MDGs

  • Globally, the number of deaths of children under 5 years of age fell from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012.

  • In developing countries, the percentage of underweight children under 5 years old dropped from 25% in 1990 to 15% in 2012.

  • While the proportion of births attended by a skilled health worker has increased globally, fewer than 50% of births are attended in the WHO African Region.

  • Globally, new HIV infections declined by 33% between 2001 and 2012.

  • Existing cases of tuberculosis are declining, along with deaths among HIV-negative tuberculosis cases.

  • (Source WHO, May 2014)

    Margaret Chan highlights challenges for health workers in Ebola outbreak

    13 August 2014 - Yesterday, the Director-General of the WHO, Dr. Margaret Chan briefed the Geneva based United Nations country missions on the Ebola outbreak and response in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. She addressed the spread of the virus to health workers working on the frontlines and highlighted important reasons why the safety of health workers is a top priority. To date, nearly 170 health-care workers have been infected, and more than 80 have died.

    GHWA Board charts way forward for global HRH strategy

    The Board of the Global Health Workforce Alliance (GHWA) held its seventeenth meeting on July 17-18 at the WHO Headquarters in Geneva; an exciting meeting that focussed on reviewing progress on the outcomes of the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health (HRH) held in Recife, Brazil in November 2013 and also exploring the way forward for GHWA.

    HIGHLIGHTS