News from TDR Director, John Reeder

TDR news item
12 October 2017

You can find us at numerous major advocacy and scientific events at this time of year with a number of new tools and lessons learnt to share. In addition, our key partnership with the World Health Organization to provide a more coordinated approach to controlling vectors has resulted in a major new strategy now available. And our Social Innovation for Health Initiative has also released new resources, so please read further for details.

Upcoming events

TDR will be at 3 main events in the coming month. For those already attending, we hope to see you there. And as always, please feel free to tweet (#tdrnews) or blog about these events.

48th Union World Conference on Lung Health, Guadalajara, Mexico, 11-14 October
A new health worker training model in Nigeria, adapted from TDR’s structured operational research and training model, has been shown to increase reporting of adverse drug reactions in a country treating the largest population of people living with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. The model is being presented under the title: Addressing the under-reporting of adverse drug reactions to accelerate the elimination of drug-resistant tuberculosis, 13 October at 11:30.

Promoting R&D capacity at the World Health Summit 15-17 October
TDR will be at the World Health Summit in Berlin with a session on enhancing research and development capacity and manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in low- and middle-income countries.

European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health 16-20 October
TDR is sponsoring 6 different oral presentations and 6 posters at the 10th European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health, being held in Antwerp, Belgium.

Resources from the recent Global Evidence Summit

The Global Evidence Summit recently held in Cape Town was the first event that brought together experts in research, systematic reviews, and policy development and implementation. More than 1300 people from 75 countries attended to discuss the theme of “Using evidence. Improving lives,” with TDR playing an active role. The methods for communicating, using and evaluating health research impact is an area that is gaining more attention and in need of guidance.

“We believe the research uptake field is very important, and we have created a stronger role for it in our new strategy under Global Engagement.”

John Reeder, TDR Director

I was very pleased to be there and participate in a funders panel. We believe the research uptake field is very important, and we have created a stronger role for it in our new strategy under “Global Engagement.” We funded 16 scientists from low- and middle-income countries to participate in the Summit and share their experiences, and they have agreed to share their PowerPoint presentations which are available in the links below.

Read what the funders and other presenters said about research priorities and uptake into policy and practice.

Hear from scientists working in low- and middle-income countries about research communication and uptake, with recommended tips and tools.

New research resources

“We know that the vertical approach to vector control through separate groups was no longer working, so we are carefully planning how to better work across units, departments and sectors, and of course, integrating research into all the phases of work.”

John Reeder, TDR Director

New global vector control response 2017-2030 now online
We have been working very closely with two departments of the World Health Organization: the Global Malaria Programme and the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, to develop a new approach to strengthen vector control worldwide. The result is the Global Vector Control Response 2017-2030 (GVCR), which is now available online. This plan calls for increased capacity, improved surveillance, better coordination and most importantly, integrated action across sectors and diseases. We know that the vertical approach to vector control through separate groups was no longer working, so we are carefully planning how to better work across units, departments and sectors, and of course, integrating research into all the phases of work.

New resources from the Social Innovation for Health Initiative
The Social Innovation for Health Initiative (SIHI) continues to expand — with more partners, two new resources and another open call, this one on challenge contests for health. As you may recall, TDR is interested in taking a research approach to learning what works and, just as importantly, what does not work. This new publication is a full report on case studies of social innovations that help document these lessons learnt. SIHI also produces a quarterly newsletter for partners, but we think it’s valuable for everyone, since it has news on recent calls and upcoming events of courses and symposia.

TDR Global profile

Each month we profile one of the thousands of people from around the globe who have had some connection with TDR. This month, it’s Pauline Byakika from Uganda. She began as a medical doctor with a strong interest in malaria care, but she found that research helped her clinical services, and now she’s empowering more Ugandan women to have medical and science careers.

TDR grants

Joint WHO-AFRO/TDR/EDCTP Small Grants Scheme for implementation research on infectious diseases of poverty
Deadline for submission: 30 November 2017
Only applicants from the WHO African Region eligible
This call is for applications for implementation research that can cover a range of diseases, conducted through close collaboration between researchers and national disease programmes.


For more information, contact:
Jamie Guth
TDR Communications Manager
Telephone: +41 79 441 2289
E-mail: guthj@who.int

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