Options for effective mechanisms to support evidence-informed policymaking in RMNCH in Asia and the Pacific

RAND Europe report looks at providing timely, reliable and high-quality evidence to inform decision-making to improve women’s and children’s health

13 JUNE 2013 — In an effort to accelerate progress for women’s and children’s health, ministers and senior officials from nearly 20 countries in the Asia-Pacific region met in November 2012 to secure commitment from a wide range of stakeholders to work together toward this goal. The outcome of this meeting, the 2012 Manila Declaration, emphasized the particular need to strengthen national and regional knowledge hubs and networks, in order to provide robust and timely evidence to support policies and programmes to advance reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH).

A new report published by RAND Europe, and commissioned by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health and the Implementation Research Platform, hosted by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been published to support these efforts. Options for effective mechanisms to support evidence-informed policymaking in RMNCH in Asia and the Pacific focuses on the need for systematic collation and synthesis of country experiences to address evidence needs and support evidence-informed policymaking.

The work was conducted through a rapid evidence assessment, key informant interviews, and in-depth case studies in four countries: Bangladesh, India, Indonesia and Nepal.

The report discusses considerations to be taken into account in the development of future mechanisms to provide timely, reliable and high-quality evidence to inform decision-making .

The findings are intended for a range of stakeholders, including policymakers, researchers and funders at national, regional and global levels. The report is hoped to be of particular importance for those in the field of RMNCH but with broader relevance in other fields similarly considering different mechanisms for supporting cross-country learning and promoting evidence-based policymaking.

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