Antibiotic resistant sepsis in newborns and infants: a major threat to achieving MDG-4 targets

Authors: Trevor Duke, Rami Subhi, Julian Kelly, Lilian Downie
Name of publication: Antibiotic resistant sepsis in newborns and infants: a major threat to achieving MDG-4 targets
Policy brief, Compass: Women's and Children's Health Knowledge Hub, January 2013.

21 JANUARY 2013 - Sepsis (severe infection) is the third most common cause of death in newborns, with around 500,000 newborn deaths annually. Infants under one year old also have high risk of sepsis. Sepsis due to antibiotic resistant bacteria is an emerging and substantial problem, and the currently recommended first-line or second-line antibiotics do not provide adequate cover. Antibiotic-resistance is amplified by modern healthcare practices. Health systems must develop a comprehensive approach to preventing and treating bacterial infection in newborns and young children, based on the principle of "first do no harm".

The Burnet Institute through the Compass Women’s and Children’s Health Knowledge Hub published a Policy Brief in January 2013 on this issue.

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