Private Enterprise for Public Health

Opportunities for Business to Improve Women’s and Children’s Health - A short guide for companies

Author(s)/Publisher(s):
The Innovation Working Group (IWG) in support of Every Woman Every Child Initiative
Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) and
The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH)
Publication date: 2012
Number of pages: 44
Language: English


This document highlights a broad range of specific and practical opportunities for improving the health of women and children while also generating value for private enterprise. We call this “shared value”. It provides information about the health needs of women and children in developing and emerging economies to help companies from various business sectors, including pharmaceutical, medical devices, ICT, media and financial identify investment opportunities – through their core business , philanthropy, employees as well as public policy and advocacy. It identifies areas where they can have the greatest impact providing access to innovative technologies, products and services. Private Enterprise for Public Health aspires to catalyze a “collective approach” to creating transformative partnerships to help save the lives of 16 million women and children. These partnerships need to be sustainable and scalable and include a broad range of public and private stakeholders to make lasting progress.

This guide originated in collaboration with the Innovation Working Group (IWG) in support of Every Woman Every Child (EWEC). The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH), which hosts the secretariat of IWG, developed this guide with Global Development and FSG social impact consultants through extensive consultations with over 80 stakeholders from more than 40 international companies, governments, UN agencies, NGOs, foundations, academia and health professionals, including meeting at the 2012 World Economic Forum in Davos. The guide was developed in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Foundation (UNF), and was supported by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad)

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