Neglected tropical diseases

Chad reporting fewer dracunculiasis infections in dogs

Dracunculiasis in Chad
© Carsten ten Brink

15 May 2017 | Geneva −− The decreasing number of dracunculiasis (guinea-worm disease) infections in dogs in Chad indicates that enhanced control and surveillance measures, supported by a robust education campaign, are working.

The World Health Organization recommends that control measures should be combined with treatment using cyclopicide of all water bodies surrounding affected villages and neighbourhoods.

Togo: first country in sub-Saharan Africa to eliminate lymphatic filariasis

8 April 2017 | Brazaville | Geneva −− The World Health Organization (WHO) has added Togo to a growing list of countries that have recently eliminated lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem.

Togo becomes the first sub-Saharan country to have achieved this global target established by the 50th World Health Assembly.

Marshall Islanders triumph against lymphatic filariasis

30 March 2017 | Manila | Geneva −− The World Health Organization (WHO) today acknowledged the Republic of the Marshall Islands in eliminating lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem.

The success in the Marshall Islands comes as another needed example that elimination as a public health problem can be achieved – an important message for the 66 countries still working towards this goal.

WHO calls for early detection, intensified efforts to eliminate leprosy

© G. Lausack

27 January 2017 | Geneva −− The World Health Organization (WHO) urges countries to scale-up interventions with a focus to avoid transmission of leprosy . An intensified, all-inclusive approach can prevent thousands of infections every year.

Dracunculiasis eradication: Mali reports zero cases in 2016

© A. Poyo / CDC / The Carter Center

11 January 2017| Geneva –– In 2016, a total of 25 human cases of dracunculiasis (guinea-worm disease) were reported to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Mali – one of the four countries with 5 human cases in 2015 – has, for the first time, reported zero cases.

Egypt leverages domestic funding to eliminate schistosomiasis

People are infected during routine agricultural, domestic,
occupational and recreational activities which expose
them to infested water. © Roland Buzzi

29 November 2016 | Geneva | Cairo −− The World Health Organization (WHO) will support Egypt in implementing a domestically funded US$ 10 million project aimed at eliminating schistosomiasis.

The project, spread out over five years, also involves snail control and the promotion of other public health interventions such as access to safe water, sanitation and health education.