Maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health

WHO and partners recommend actions to improve adolescent health

Two mekong youth enjoy time together.
WHO

16 May 2017 -- More than 3000 adolescents die every day from largely preventable causes, according to a new report from WHO and partners. Global accelerated action for the health of adolescents (AA-HA!): Guidance to support country implementation – assists governments in what to do – as well as how to do it – as they respond to the health needs of adolescents in their countries. Case studies show that what is being recommended actually can be done. The full document with case studies, a summary document, a comic book, brochure and infographics are available below.

International Day of the Midwife 2017

A midwife counsels a woman in a clinic.
ICM

Every year 5 May is celebrated globally as the International Day of the Midwife. The theme for this year celebration is "Midwives, Mothers and Families: Partners for Life!" Midwives everywhere understand that by working in partnership with women and their families they can support them to make better decisions about what they need to have a safe and fulfilling birth. The event is organised each year by the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM). There is also a Virtual International Day of the Midwife: an annual free 24-hour online international conference celebrating midwifery.

World Immunization Week 24-30 April

The Indigenous Health Teams members check vaccine packaging, Brazil.
WHO/A. Zambrana

The journey of vaccines in Brazil. Thanks to a highly effective National Immunization Programme, most Brazilian parents can feel confident that their children will get the lifesaving vaccines they need – when they need them. Routine vaccination coverage in the country averages above 95% for most vaccines on the child immunization schedule every year – exceeding WHO’s recommendation of at least 90% coverage.

Let's talk about depression - adolescents

7 April, World Health Day – Depression causes mental anguish and impacts on people’s ability to carry out even the simplest everyday tasks, with sometimes devastating consequences for relationships with family and friends. It also affects people’s ability to work and study. At worst, depression can lead to suicide, now the second leading cause of death among 15-29-year olds. Yet depression can be prevented and treated. A better understanding of depression will help reduce the stigma associated with the condition, and lead to more people seeking help. This short video, focusing on depression among adolescents and young adults, highlights the importance of talking as the first step towards getting help.

Let's talk about depression - Women with young babies

7 April, World Health Day – Depression after childbirth is common. It causes mental anguish and can prevent people from being able to carry out family responsibilities fully. Yet depression can be prevented and treated. A better understanding of depression will help reduce the stigma associated with the condition, and lead to more people seeking help. This short video, focusing on depression among women with young babies, highlights some of the symptoms of depression following childbirth and the importance of talking as the first step towards getting help.

International Women’s Day - 8 March

A group of young African women
UNICEF/Pirozzi

8 March 2017 – On International Women’s Day, WHO reaffirms its commitment to gender equality and women’s and girls’ fundamental rights, particularly to ensuring that women across the globe are able to make decisions about their bodies and their environment. When women are able to decide about their health and the things that influence it, including their sexual and reproductive health and environment, they control their futures and their lives and fulfil their limitless potential.

Environmental pollution kills 1.7 million children each year

Children playing on the beach at low tide in Hangan Village, Buka, Papua New Guinea
WHO/Y. Shimizu

6 March 2017 – Environmental risks cause more than 1 in 4 deaths in children aged under 5 years every year, according to 2 new reports from WHO. Children are especially vulnerable to pollution due to their developing organs and immune systems, and smaller bodies and airways. The most common causes of death – diarrhoea, malaria and pneumonia – are preventable with safe water and clean cooking fuels.

A Network to halve maternal and newborn deaths in facilities in 5 years

Elizabeth Wezena with babies in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit of the Bolgatanga Regional Hospital in the Upper East region of Ghana.
UNICEF

February 2017 - Many women, their babies and children still die, or suffer from life-long disabilities, even after reaching a health facility, due to poor care practices. Improving the quality of care provided is of utmost urgency. With a target of halving maternal and newborn deaths in facilities in 5 years, national governments from 9 first wave countries and partners are joining forces to establish a Network to improve the quality of care provided to mothers, newborns and children. The Network will support countries to achieve their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and achieve the vision set out by the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health.

Managing possible serious bacterial infection in young infants when referral is not feasible

A mother and her newborn child.
S Qazi

13 February 2017 -- Infections are responsible for about one fifth of the world’s annual 2.7 million neonatal deaths. In South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa about one quarter of all neonatal deaths are due to infections, Hospitalization and life-saving treatment for the sick infant may not be accessible, acceptable or affordable to families in settings with high newborn mortality. A new WHO/UNICEF Statement in support of 2015 WHO guidelines provides options for the use of simplified antibiotic regimens that are both safe and effective for outpatient treatment of clinical severe infection and fast-breathing pneumonia among young infants weighing at least 1.5 kg.




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Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (MCA)
World Health Organization
20 Avenue Appia
1211 Geneva 27
Switzerland

Tel.: +41 22 791 3281
Fax: +41 22 791 4853
E-mail: mncah@who.int