Overview

Introduction

Global Report on Urban Health

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Photo source: WHO/Anna Kari

We are at an unprecedented moment in human development as the greatest migration in history unfolds around us.

By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities. Between now and then, the population of cities will nearly double.

Photo source: WHO/Anna Kari

We have an extraordinary opportunity to improve the health and wellbeing of people living in the cities of today. And to shape healthier cities for tomorrow.

Cities can lead in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and universal health coverage.

Photo source: "2 - Raahgiri Day 15" by WRI EMBARQ Sustainable Urban Mobility is licensed under CC BY 2.0

But none of this will be possible while millions of people in cities are excluded from these opportunities.

Photo source: WHO/Anna Kari

The Global Report on Urban Health presents new evidence on health in cities everywhere.

Photo source: "Medellin" by Marcelo Druck is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Section 1 of this report presents the major urban health challenges that would need to be tackled in order to realize a vision for healthier cities. It presents evidence of deprived and high-risk populations within cities as well as possible solutions to control preventable ill-health within them.

Section 2 presents evidence that in cities, progress in health depends not only on the strength of health systems, but also on shaping urban environments. It shows how aspects of city life – such as water and sanitation, urban planning, housing, transport, and safety – are interconnected and both separately and together have implications for health. It illustrates how interventions in and across these areas can improve health and deliver co-benefits.

Section 3 brings together the issues discussed in this report under the overarching issue of urban governance. The quality of governance in cities is important for local populations, but also for the achievement of international goals such as the SDGs. The section outlines key elements of urban governance and the roles of civil society, the private sector and government to shape the future of public health in cities.

Continue scrolling to interact with two of the new data features from the report, looking at how urban residents fared with respect to the Millennium Development Goals and how urban areas have progressed toward universal health coverage. You can navigate anytime to download the report, the executive summary, or the interactive data explorer tool using the menu above.

THE MDG SCORECARD

Reviewing MDG Achievement in Urban Areas

New analysis in the report reviews how people in urban areas fared with respect to seven targets for the Millennium Development Goals.

Underweight Children Under 5 Years Under 5 Mortality Rate Measles vaccination Skilled Birth Attendance Antenatal Care Correct Knowledge of HIV (women) Improved Drinking Water Sources

Underweight Children Under 5 Years

Under 5 Mortality Rate

Measles

Skilled Birth Attendance

Antenatal Care

Women HIV

Improved Drinking Water Sources

Considerable MDG Progress in Urban Areas.

The solid green bars indicate the proportion of urban populations that have met the MDG target, while the striped bars indicate those that nearly reached the target, within 25%. The data can also be explored by UN region.

Underweight Children Under 5 Years

Under 5 Mortality Rate

Measles

Skilled Birth Attendance

Antenatal Care

Women HIV

Improved Drinking Water Sources

Underweight Children Under 5 Years Under 5 Mortality Rate Measles Skilled Birth Attendance Antenatal Care Women HIV Improved Drinking Water Sources

The Urban Poor Continue to Lag Behind.

The yellow bars indicate the progress of the urban poor toward the MDG targets. Solid yellow bars indicate poor urban populations that have met the MDG target, while striped yellow bars indicate poor urban populations that came within 25% of meeting the target.









Photo source: WHO/Anna Kari

UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE DASHBOARD FOR URBAN AREAS

New analysis presented in this Report reveals evidence of how urban populations have progressed toward universal health coverage (UHC) and is presented in a new UHC Dashboard. Three interactive data presentations below illustrate urban health and UHC.

HOW TO READ THE DASHBOARD

In this data feature, average urban coverage is given by a vertical white line, measured along the x-axis. Coverage for the wealthiest and the poorest 20% of the urban population is given by horizontal green lines measured along the y-axis. The coverage gap between the wealthiest and the poorest is given by the yellow square.

Place your cursor over any country to reveal urban coverage values.

Coverage for Antenatal Care in Selected Urban Areas.

The UHC Dashboard in the Global Report illustrates urban inequalities in coverage for nine tracer indicators of UHC in more than 90 countries. This demonstration shows urban coverage for antenatal care in a selection of countries.

The UHC Dashboard demonstrates significant inequalities in access to essential services in urban areas.

Even where overall coverage is high, coverage can be highly unequal.

Many urban areas can meet the UHC targets overall while still leaving the urban poor behind.

UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE AND EQUITY ARE ACHIEVABLE

Countries can achieve UHC coverage levels equitably.

Countries can raise overall coverage levels and close the equity gap on essential health services in urban areas.

As the global community transitions into a new era of sustainable development, committed leadership is needed to create healthier, more equitable cities.

This report identifies health challenges faced by hundreds of millions of vulnerable people currently living in cities around the world, as well as policies and actions for sustainable, healthy urban development for the majority of humanity who will reside in the cities of the future.

Photo source: "Dreaming awake about a more sustainable future. Belo Horizonte, Brazil" by Mariana Gil, EMBARQ Brasil is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Continue scrolling to download the report, the executive summary, and to engage with the interactive data explorer.