Ionizing radiation

WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings

Delegates at the WHO HQ, Geneva during 15th to 17th December 2008 for the Technical Meeting on the WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Healthcare Settings.
WHO
Delegates at the WHO HQ, Geneva during 15th to 17th December 2008 for the Technical Meeting on the WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Healthcare Settings.

WHO is conducting a Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings to mobilize the health sector towards safe and effective use of radiation in medicine. By integrating radiation protection into the concepts of good medical practice and health care service quality, this initiative provides a platform for collaboration between health authorities, radiation protection regulators, international agencies, professional societies, patient networks, scientific bodies, academic institutions and other stakeholders to improve the implementation of radiation safety standards in healthcare settings.

Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging

 Billington Jesse Semwogerere and his mom Victoria Nandagire have a conversation with Dr. Deborah Babirye at Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) about the risk of radiation during diagnostic testing, such as a CT scan.
E.N. Kawooya, Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Uganda)

April 2016 -- Dialogue with patients and families is particularly relevant in the field of paediatric imaging. Accurate and effective radiation risk communication is also necessary between health care providers who request or perform radiological medical procedures in children.

This new document “Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging: information to support health care discussions about benefit and risk” is intended to serve as a tool for health care providers to communicate known or potential radiation risks associated with paediatric imaging procedures, to support risk-benefit dialogue in health care settings.

WHO organized a webinar to present the new document on 22 April 2016 in Headquarters Geneva, Switzerland.

Diagnostic imaging

x-ray image
Diagnostic imaging team

Imaging for medical purposes involves a team which includes the service of radiologists, radiographers (X-ray technologists), sonographers (ultrasound technologists), medical physicists, nurses, biomedical engineers, and other support staff working together to optimize the wellbeing of patients, one at a time. Appropriate use of medical imaging requires a multidisciplinary approach.

Bonn Call for Action

The International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held 3-7 December 2012 in Bonn, Germany. It was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), co-sponsored by WHO. The main outcome of this event was the Bonn Call for Action highlighting ten main priority actions that were identified as being essential for the strengthening of radiation protection in medicine over the next decade.

Justification of medical exposures

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The system of radiological protection aims to control radiation risks without unduly limiting the potential benefits for individuals and for society. The new International Radiation Basic Safety Standards (BSS) have expanded the requirements for justification of medical exposures pand optimization of protection and safety in medicine.

Radiation safety culture in medicine

WHO, IRPA and IOMP are conducting a joint project on Radiation Safety Culture in Medicine open to national/regional and international partners. The purpose of this project is the development of a framework document to support the establishment and maintenance of a radiation safety culture in health-care facilities, as an integral component of safety culture programmes in medical settings.