Intestinal worms

© C. Carnemark/World Bank. Children lining up to recieve treatment for soil-transmitted helminthiases, Nigeria, 2012.

Soil-transmitted helminths
Soil-transmitted helminth infections are among the most common infections worldwide and affect the poorest and most deprived communities. They are transmitted by eggs present in human faeces which in turn contaminate soil in areas where sanitation is poor.

The main species that infect people are the roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), the whipworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale.

Soil-transmitted helminth infections are widely distributed in all WHO Regions. | Read more

fact buffet

2011

30%Reported coverage school-age children

Soil-transmitted helminthiases: number of children treated in 2010

2012

212 MillionNumber of deworming tablets for school age children donated in 2012. Expected coverage school-age children: >40%

Eliminating soil-transmitted helminthiases as a public health problem in children: Progress report 2001−2010 and strategic plan 2011−2020

2013

189 MillionNumber of deworming tablets for school age children donated (until February 2013). Target 295 million

Eliminating soil-transmitted helminthiases as a public health problem in children: Progress report 2001−2010 and strategic plan 2011−2020

STH in the news!

06 March 2015 | Geneva
Soil-transmitted helminthiases: number of children treated in 2013
Weekly epidemiological record, No.10, 2015, 90, 89–94

23 February 2015 | Geneva
Assessing the epidemiology of soil-transmitted helminths during a transmission assessment survey in the Global programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis
Ref: ISBN 978 92 4 150 838 4


NTD Country profiles

Country profiles present the most recent epidemiological information on targeted diseases and chart progress in implementing preventive chemotherapy in the country.

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us at Email:wormcontrol@who.int