Influenza

IMAI District Clinician Manual: Hospital Care for Adolescents and Adults

Guidelines for the Management of Common Illnesses with Limited Resources - Volume 1

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Authors:
World Health Organization

Publication details

Number of pages: 504
Publication date: July 2011
Languages: English
ISBN: ISBN: 978 92 4 154828 1

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IMAI District Clinician Manual: Hospital Care for Adolescents and Adults

Guidelines for the Management of Common Illnesses with Limited Resources - Volume 1

This manual is written for clinicians working at the district hospital who diagnose and manage sick adolescents and adults in resource-constrained settings. It aims to support clinical reasoning, and to provide an effective clinical approach and protocols for the management of common and serious or potentially life-threatening conditions at district hospitals. The target audience thus includes doctors, clinical officers, health officers, and senior nurse practitioners. It has been designed to be applicable in both high and low HIV prevalence settings

For influenza patient care, users can refer to Volume 1 for influenza and influenza associated complications. This volume covers emergency triage assessment and treatment, and acute care for a severely ill patient. It also describes the clinical procedures commonly used in emergency and acute care, and gives a summary of preventive measures, drugs used and the steps necessary for infection control and reporting for surveillance.

Good clinical care is a component of most effective public health approaches. Simplification and standardization of case detection and first-line treatments support decentralization and expand access to care. Within a district network, the district clinician receives patients in referral who have not responded to first-line treatment or who require hospitalization for severe illness. The ability to provide effective emergency care for severely ill patients, to establish a likely differential diagnosis, to provide appropriate management and then monitor the patient’s response to treatment can contribute substantially to the health of the community.