Humanitarian Health Action

Donor centre

WHO is committed to saving lives and reducing suffering in times of crisis. Yet we can only carry out this important work if we have the resources to do so.

WHO relies on voluntary contributions from Member States and other partners to fund our work in emergencies. Together we can achieve our goal -- a WHO that is well-equipped to respond quickly and effectively to any emergency which threatens the lives and health of people anywhere in the world.

Emergency response plans 2017

Nearly 93 million people live in crisis-affected countries. These crises include disease outbreaks, natural disasters and conflict. The crises in each of the countries listed below has had an impact on the delivery of health services, whether or not the crisis is related to a health issue, leaving already vulnerable populations even more at risk.

Funding needs for WHO's core emergency capacity 2016-17

Total requested US$ 118 111 411

WHO’s core emergency capacity encompasses work in support of Member States’ preparedness for emergencies, the Global Health Cluster, organizational readiness for emergency response, information management, policy development and advocacy.

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Deploying quality-assured medical teams when disaster strikes

2 February 2017 -- Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) are groups of health professionals (such as doctors, nurses, paramedics) who treat patients affected by an emergency or disaster. They come from governments, charities, non-governmental organizations, militaries and international organizations such as the International Red Cross/Red Crescent movement.
The Australian government has been a big supporter of the EMT initiative from the very beginning, providing both self-sufficient medical teams and funding. They also seconded key personnel to set up the EMT Initiative at WHO.

Responding to forgotten crises - Together with the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund

27 January 2017 -- With the number and scale of humanitarian crises around the world, some countries have fallen off the global radar. That is the case for countries like the Central African Republic, Libya and Sudan, where pressing needs don’t seem to garner the world’s attention. This can make it difficult to raise the funding necessary to carry out humanitarian response plans.

Syrian Arab Republic donor update Q3

18 November 2016 -- The third quarter (Q3) of 2016 saw a dramatic escalation of military activities, especially around Aleppo. Over half of Syria’s public hospitals and almost half of its public health care centres are either closed or are only partially functioning. Health needs throughout Syria remain acute.
Despite many challenges, and thanks to sustained funding from humanitarian donors, WHO has continued to implement emergency health programmes. This report describes the main achievements of WHO’s country office in Damascus and its hubs in Gaziantep (Turkey) and Amman (Jordan) during the third quarter of 2016.

WHO welcomes US$ 5 million from Kuwait to provide life-saving health services to people in Mosul, Iraq

WHO welcomes the generous support of the State of Kuwait through a US$ 5 million donation to help people in the city of Mosul obtain greater medical assistance, particularly the most vulnerable — women, children, the injured and people with special needs.

WHO has released a report on the Organization's activities in Syria in the third quarter of 2016.

Recent contributions to WHO’s work in humanitarian emergencies*

CERF

US$ 200 000 for Niger

ECHO

US$ 422 889 for Bhutan

OCHA

US$ 2 946 152 for Ethiopia and Syria

OCHA Common Humanitarian Funds

US$ 3 604 945 for Afghanistan, Central African Republic and South Sudan

USAID

US$ 250 000 for Nepal


*As in August 2016

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