Humanitarian Health Action

Madagascar

Donor alert: Plague in Madagascar (updated 4 October 2017)

Team members of Institut Pasteur Madagascar (IPM) dissect a rat suspected of being infected with plague during previous outbreak in January 2017.
Team members of Institut Pasteur Madagascar (IPM) dissect a rat suspected of being infected with plague during previous outbreak in January 2017.
WHO/Madagascar

Updated 4 October 2017 -- Pneumonic plague has been detected in several cities in Madagascar. It is a form of plague that is highly transmissible (person-to-person) and quickly causes death without treatment. WHO is concerned that the outbreak may spread because it is already present in several cities and this is just the start of the plague epidemic season, which usually runs from September to April. Urgent public health response is required and support is needed to strengthen capacities already available at country level to control the outbreak.

WHO scales up response to plague in Madagascar

1 October 2017 | Geneva - WHO is rapidly scaling up its response to an outbreak of plague in Madagascar that has spread to the capital and port towns, infecting more than 100 people in just a few weeks. The Government of Madagascar has confirmed that the death of a Seychellois national was due to pneumonic plague. The basketball coach died in hospital in Antananarivo on Wednesday (September 27) while visiting the island nation for a sports event.

Plague outbreak in remote Madagascar puzzles investigators

May 2017 -- Plague, though terrifying, is nothing new in Madagascar, where around 600 cases are reported annually. But there was something different about a suspected plague outbreak reported last December. The outbreak’s location was far away from recent outbreaks and implied plague had spread to new parts of the island nation, but health officials couldn’t explain it.

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Health impacts of the global food security crisis

In Madagascar, 15% of children aged under 5 suffer from acute malnutrition (wasting) and 53% are chronically malnourished (stunted), according to WHO data.