Foodborne trematode infections

© Albis Gabrielli/WHO

Foodborne trematode infections, or foodborne trematodiases, are a group of parasitic infections caused by trematodes (flatworms or “flukes”) that are acquired through ingestion of food contaminated with the larval stages of the parasite.

Transmission is linked to human behaviour patterns related to methods of producing, processing and preparing foods. In particular, dishes containing raw fish, crustaceans and plants are an established dietary tradition of many populations living in countries where these diseases are endemic. Foodborne trematodiases are thus sustained and perpetuated by entrenched cultural practices.

  • The disease
    Epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and control

The disease

The term opisthorchiasis, or cat liver fluke disease, indicates two distinct infections: the one with Opisthorchis viverrini, which is referred to as opisthorchiasis viverrini, and the one with Opisthorchis felineus, which is referred to as opisthorchiasis felinea.

  • The disease
    Epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and control

Partnership