Ebola virus disease

Ebola vaccine trial

Ebola vaccine provides protection, trial confirms

23 December 2016 – An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial, according to results published today in The Lancet. The vaccine is the first to prevent infection from one of the most lethal known pathogens, and the findings add weight to early trial results published last year. The vaccine, called rVSV-ZEBOV, was studied in a trial involving 11 841 people in Guinea during 2015.

S. Hawkey
Kimberley Steeds, Ebola vaccine trial team member, in the Ebola vaccine laboratory, Donka Hospital in Conakry, Guinea.

Essential health systems situation reports: Liberia

2016 -- Recovering from an outbreak requires getting essential health services back up and running, and addressing the weaknesses of the health system. WHO's is working with affected countries in rebuilding their health systems.

WHO/S. Hawkey
Ebola vaccine trial team follows-up with a vaccine trial participant, Katongourou, Guinea

After Ebola in West Africa: Unpredictable risks, preventable epidemics

September 2016 -- Empirical and modeling studies conducted during the West African epidemic have shown that large epidemics of Ebola virus disease are preventable — a rapid response can interrupt transmission and restrict the size of outbreaks, even in densely populated cities. The critical question now is how to ensure that populations and their health services are ready for the next outbreak, wherever it may occur.

WHO/S. Hawkey
Infection prevention training, during the Ebola outbreak, Guinea

The role of training in outbreaks

The magnitude of the 2014-2015 West Africa Ebola outbreak combined with a dearth of local and international expertise in tackling the disease necessitated training on a mass scale. Over the duration of the epidemic, WHO and partners trained more than 8,000 health professionals from over 80 nations, including the Ebola-affected countries. To better understand the impact of the trainings, WHO commissioned a review, which was conducted by an independent, external body.

WHO
At the Ebola survivors' clinic in Liberia, 2015

Guidance on clinical care of survivors

Ebola virus has been detected at low levels in breast milk up to 16 months after onset of Ebola virus disease symptoms. More evidence is needed to know the precise duration and infectivity of Ebola virus persistence in breast milk. Ebola survivors who are lactating may wish to have their breast milk tested for Ebola virus by RT-PCR. Women who do not know the status of their breast milk or who were tested and for whom no Ebola virus RNA was detected should continue breastfeeding.

WHO/C. Bailey



Rebuilding health systems

Health systems recovery

Recovering from an outbreak requires getting essential health services back up and running, and addressing the weaknesses of the health system. WHO's is working with affected countries in rebuilding their health systems.

Survivors

Ebola survivors

Ebola survivors need comprehensive support for the medical and psychosocial challenges they face and also to minimize the risk of continued Ebola virus transmission.

Preparedness

Preparedness for emergencies

WHO is working with countries in implementing plans to prevent and respond to a possible epidemic of Ebola virus disease.


Research and development

Research and development blueprint

Ebola clinical trials are bringing the world close to having its first safe and effective Ebola vaccine, while researchers are learning more every day about the long-term effects of Ebola on survivors.