Bulletin of the World Health Organization

The epidemiology of child homicides in South Africa

Shanaaz Mathews, Naeemah Abrahams, Rachel Jewkes, Lorna J Martin & Carl Lombard

Volume 91, Number 8, August 2013, 562-568

Table 2. Child homicide rates, by age and sex of victim, South Africa, 2009

Age (years) Malesa
Femalesb
All childrenc
No. (95% CI) Rated (95% CI) No. (95% CI) Rated (95% CI) No. (95% CI) Rated (95% CI)
< 5 193 (149–238) 7.6 (5.8–9.3) 208 (145–270) 8.3 (5.8–10.7) 405 (309–501) 7.9 (6.1–9.9)
5–9 42 (16–68) 1.6 (0.6–2.6) 45 (23–67) 1.7 (0.9–2.6) 87 (58–116) 1.7 (1.1–2.2)
10–14 71 (40–103) 2.7 (1.5–3.9) 39 (16–63) 1.5 (0.6–2.4) 110 (75–146) 2.1 (1.4–2.8)
15–17 344 (225–463) 21.7 (14.2–29.2) 72 (37–106) 4.6 (2.4–6.8) 416 (273–558) 13.2 (8.7–17.7)
< 18 650 (522–779) 6.9 (5.6–8.3) 364 (292–434) 3.9 (3.2–4.7) 1018 (848–1187) 5.5 (4.6–6.4)

CI, confidence interval.

a Crude number before weighting: 261; number after weighting: 651.

b Crude number before weighting: 140; number after weighting: 363.

c Crude number before weighting: 402; number after weighting: 1018 – this value includes four cases that were excluded from the subgroup analysis because the sex and cause of death could not be determined owing to the decomposition of the body.

d Homicides per 100 000 children in the sex and age group.