Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Trends in smoking and quitting in China from 1993 to 2003: National Health Service Survey data

Juncheng Qian, Min Cai, Jun Gao, Shenglan Tang, Ling Xu & Julia Alison Critchley

Volume 88, Number 10, October 2010, 769-776

Table 1. Trend in the prevalence of smoking, currently or ever in the past, by gender and urban or rural location, China, 1993–2003

Year n
Ever smokersa (%)
Current smokersb (%)
Total Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women
Urban
1993 43 531 21 115 22 416 31.1 57.3 6.4
1998 45 898 22 397 23 501 30.3 55.8 5.9 27.2 50.3 5.1
2003 42 683 20 702 21 981 26.1 49.6 4.0 23.9 45.4 3.6
2003 42 683 20 702 21 981 19.0 36.3 2.7
Rural
1993 113 377 56 847 56 530 32.6 60.4 4.6
1998 119 327 60 669 58 658 31.4 58.0 3.9 29.5 54.5 3.6
2003 110 766 55 878 54 888 28.4 53.0 3.2 26.8 50.2 3.0
2003 110 766 55 878 54 888 21.3 40.0 2.2
Allc
1993 156 908 77 962 78 946 32.2 59.6 5.1
1998 165 225 83 066 82 159 31.1 57.4 4.5 28.9 53.4 4.0
2003 153 449 76 580 76 869 27.7 52.1 3.5 26.0 48.9 3.2
2003 153 449 76 580 76 869 20.6 39.0 2.3

a In all survey years, “ever smokers” were defined as those individuals who were either current smokers or who had smoked sometime in the past.

b In 1993, 1998 and 2003, the category “current smokers” included those individuals who reported smoking at the time of the survey and had smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime. In 2003, the category was more stringently defined as individuals who, in addition to smoking at the time of the survey, had smoked at least one cigarette daily for a continuous period of at least 6 months. This explains the two sets of figures for 2003, the first of which complies with the broader and the second with the narrower definition.

c Approximately 30% of the total sample was from urban areas and 70% from rural areas.

Data obtained from China's 1993, 1998 and 2003 National Health Services Surveys.

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