Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Volume 84, Number 3, March 2006, 161-256

IN THIS MONTH'S BULLETIN

Counting the dead and determining how they died; HIV/AIDS deaths in Zimbabwe; Lessons from the Field: maternal mortality in Senegal; Public Health Classic: the origins of verbal autopsy

EDITORIALS

Making deaths count
- Kenneth Hill

Demographic surveillance sites and emerging challenges in international health
- Frank Baiden, Abraham Hodgson, & Fred N Binka

Potential and limits of verbal autopsies
- Michel L. Garenne

NEWS

News

Malaria deaths are the hardest to count; Mexico’s quest for complete mortality data; Counting deaths in China

WHO News

Bulletin interview: mortality data is essential for health; Tobacco Convention: countries “changed history”; Recent news from WHO

RESEARCH

Measuring mortality in developing countries
- Martin Adjuik et al.

Numerator/denominator bias and inequalities in occupational mortality
- Gail M Williams, Jake M Najman, & Alexandra Clavarino

The InterVA model: verbal autopsy interpretation in rural Ethiopia
- Mesganaw Fantahun et al.

LESSONS FROM THE FIELD

POLICY & PRACTICE

Tracking progress on child mortality
- Child Mortality Coordination Group

Mortality statistics in Thailand
- V. Tangcharoensathien et al.

PUBLIC HEALTH REVIEWS

Verbal autopsy
- Nadia Soleman, Daniel Chandramohan, & Kenji Shibuya

PUBLIC HEALTH CLASSIC

Assessing probable causes of death using a standardized questionnaire: a study in rural Senegal
- Michel Garenne & Olivier Fontaine

Commentary: Assessing probable causes of death without death registration or certificates: a new science?
- Vincent Fauveau

LETTERS

Counting the dead and what they died from
- Gérard Pavillon et al.
Capturing health information — a coding perspective
- Sue Walker
Authors’ response: improving the quality of data on causes of death
- Colin Mathers et al.


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